Other Music NYC ‘Double O Groove’ Review

Other Music NYC Review:

“Everyone needs to stop what they are doing and pay special attention to this album. Cornershop returned from an extended hiatus last year with the excellent glam-gospel soul of the criminally slept-on Judy Sucks A Lemon For Breakfast, which saw Tjinder Singh, Ben Ayres, & co sharpening their hooks, tightening their grooves, and delivering what may actually have been their tightest, catchiest album yet, fusing T.Rex with Syl Johnson with a touch of Ananda Shankar‘s rock’n’raga (to very much oversimplify). After such a perfect distillation of the band’s influences and enthusiasms (better even than the group’s classic When I Was Born For the 7th Time), where to go next? During the group’s time away, folks like Diplo and MIA (to name but a few) took the blueprints drafted by Cornershop and refitted them to the hip-hop/dance scene, helping to take globally-conscious influences into Western pop music with hugely successful results. Prior to Judy Sucks A Lemon, one of the only dispatches we had really heard from the group since 2002 was a stellar double-A-side single “Topnotch/Natch” in 2004, which saw the group showcasing the heavenly Punjabi vocals of newcomer Bubbley Kaur, a singer the group allegedly discovered in their local launderette, delivering what was simultaneously the group’s most vintage and modern recording to date. (It’s also worth noting that MIA herself asked to appear on the single, throwing down a guest verse on a remix of “Topknot.”)

Well, here we are in 2011 with The Double ‘O’ Groove Of, ten songs of deep, sunny funk and dusty collusionist grooves with the gorgeous Kaur at center stage, placing perhaps the heaviest emphasis yet on the group’s Indian roots with spectacular results. Tjinder‘s vocals are nowhere to be found on this album, yet his and Ayres‘s voices are heard as loudly and clearly as Kaur‘s, fusing her siren calls into musical tapestries that enliven but never overwhelm her vocals; everything from percolating, brassy funk breaks to Tin Pan Alley piano are utilized to dizzying, dazzling effect. Overtop this choice blend, Kaur sounds like a seasoned playback singer, and the arrangements ably update the postmodern feel of classic Bollywood composers like RD Burman by fusing new influences into the the mix; the beatbox boom-bap, harpsichords, and squelchy bass of “Double Decker Eyelashes” and the sliced’n’diced brass & woodwind fanfares of “Once There Was A Wintertime” draw direct lineage from Asha Bhosle to Run DMC, while “The 911 Curry” sees Kaur chanting overtop a boisterous, Diplo-esque bhangra/moog beat. Rather than fighting the grooves, Kaur sounds relaxed and confident, and it’s this chilled confidence that helps make the album such a refreshing success. On “The Biro Pen,” the group delivers a chunky Randy Newman-esque piano line overtop thick, crashing drums, while album closer “Don’t Shake It” injects fingerpicked acoustic guitar runs into a Hammond organ groover, sounding like Harry Nilsson sitting in with James Brown and Richard “Groove” Holmes, inspiring you to shake it after all. Thankfully, the group is also savvy enough to include both sides of the aforementioned single; the hypnotic circular guitar figures and clattering dholki drum patterns of “Topknot” are perhaps the most relaxing moments on the album, while the double-dutch breaks and pop-locking bass of “Natch” are a personal favorite, with Kaur singing deep in the echo chamber like a ghost of go-gos past.

All in all, this has been one of the most infectious, joyful, and straight-up funky records I’ve had the pleasure of hearing so far this year; since first receiving a copy about a month ago, I’ve not been able to stop listening to it. I’ve got to give top marks to Cornershop for pulling off such a brilliant slice of multiculturalist unity without making a big f-ing deal about it. And that overall is what makes the record such a success; where many artists are keen to push their broad-ranging influences and obsessions in your face, Cornershop and Bubbley Kaur just want you to take them at face value– it’s all music, it’s all valid, and best of all, it’s all good. I’m hard-pressed to believe that anyone is going to release a new album in 2011 that I’m going to enjoy more than I do this one, and I can’t give a higher recommendation than that.”[IQ]

The Paperhead-Record Collector Review 4/5

The Paperhead release their debut release in the UK, Focus In On The Looking Glass on Ample Play Records on vinyl format only.

On first listen, you may think that you’ve stumbled across some long lost nugget from 1968. In fact, The Paperhead take their name from a lyric in a song by golden-age psychedelic age group July and they deal in lysergic haziness, with a colourfully confusing filter. Yet while the record may have a fairly vintage sound, it was written and recorded in the summer of 2010 by three 18 year old kids from Nashville, Tennessee. It has been championed on a number of occasions by James Endicott and here are what Record Collector and Shindig Magazine say about it:

a focus on the Singhles Club’s printable artwork

the Singhles Club & its printable artwork (AKA digital popadoms)

Tjinder Singh has produced unreleased tracks, which have been coming out as one-sided releases called The Singhles Club, and at the same time freeing up the hard disk of Mr. Singh’s headspace. For 6pounds Subscribers get 6 tracks in their inbox at the pace of one month.

With each track Subscribers get a collectable printable artbook. We are pleased to have developed relationships with film-makers, graphic designers and illustrators, who have created these artworks:

1. Non-Stop Radio character from video turned 3D to fold and play for any office with a sense of humour.

2. Colouring Sheet created by Rude, who have recently design a range of products for Tate Modern

3. Urban Turban Mask by our own Nick Edwards who has done many of our art sleeves over the years including the all the record covers in the Brimful of Asha video, & most of the Cornershop catalogue.

Solid Gold featuring Katie and will it feature in your head if given a couple of listens. In line with our past releases it is out of line with what other music is going down, and to help you swallow & celebrate that difference we have a 4. Judy Sucks A Lemon Cocktail Recipe as designed by Helen Rawlinsonwww.helenrawlinson.com, with a recipe created by the forever tip top Dishoom



To join the Singhles Club at any time and get your back issues subscribe here

Any questions please email info@cornershop.com

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Don’t Shake It (Let It Free)

Don’t Shake It (Let It Free) E.P. plus a Don’t Forget Tibet video

Cornershop and Free Tibet have collaborated to create this educational & hard hitting video.

Please support us, watch the video and share the link as much as possible. Help us spread the word about the cause ‘Don’t Forget Tibet’, link here for the video.

Please follow us on twitter @cornershophq & @freetibetorg

The video has been promoted by NME.com whom are getting more political these days, as the world crumbles around them.

Don’t Shake It with two new remixes is out 19th September.

Non-Stop Radio – The Italian Job Remixes
The first track of the Singhles Club series has been treated to three remixes by respected Italian sound stackers Casa Del Mirto, Lorenzo Marinelli & Lorenzo Venturini buy the EP here

The video has been remixed by its original creators Rocket Science. So that makes it a collaboration between England, India, France and Italy, but this is no football match, it’s a song that does not stop.

Just as we can see David Cameron‘s holiday coming to an end, so has this newsletter, best Tjinder & Ben

The Singhles Club, exclusive & limited

The Singhles Club //

Tjinder Singh from Cornershop has produced many outtake tracks, which will be coming out as one-sided releases called The Singhles Club, and at the same time freeing up the hard disk of Mr. Singh’s headspace.

Outtake tracks they may be – quality they certainly are! Most are collaborations with friends & foes alike, helping bridge a gap between the variety of the Cornershop back catalogue and its biblical passages. (Please note, each track will come with a very special digital popadom)

A total of 6 Songs will be individually available, as part of the The Singhles Club subscription, which is simply 6pounds for 6 tracks via cornershop.com only.

What Did The Hippie….Track 2 of 6 The Singhles Club

Tjinder Singh has produced many outtake tracks, which will be coming out as one-sided releases called The Singhles Club, and at the same time freeing up the hard disk of Mr. Singh’s headspace. Most are collaborations with friends & foes, helping bridge a gap between the variety of the Cornershop back catalogue and its biblical passages.

A total of 6 Songs will be individually available, or as part of the The Singhles Club subscription, which is simply £6 for 6 tracks via cornershop.com

Subscription will entitle you to receive 6 digital singles (and most tracks will come with a very special digital popadom), sent to you on a monthly basis.

Non-Stop Radio by Cornershop featuring Celeste the opening track for The Singhles Club.  Next song in the Series coming soon…..What Did The Hippie Have In His Bag – a song put together for a kids cartoon series.  It will be used as part of this years Manchester International Festival (1st – 17th July), with a video by Rude (the kind people that did our Soul School video), in a space called Pop O Motion, whose logo appears here, to give you a glimpse of the funk of the project.  The song was finished with the help of Year 1 at Castle Hill Primary School, Bolton, during a 3 day residency (as pictured).

Cornershop – What Did The Hippie Have In His Bag (AmplePlayRecords) by cornershop

The Singhles Club & brand new Cornershop track

THE SINGHLES CLUB: would you like a new Cornershop song in your inbox from time to time?

Tjinder Singh has produced unreleased tracks, which will be coming out as one-sided releases called The Singhles Club, and at the same time freeing up the hard disk of Mr. Singh’s headspace.

Most are collaborations with friends & foes alike, helping bridge a gap between the variety of the Cornershop back catalogue and its biblical passages.

A total of 6 Songs will be individually available at a pace of about one a month as part of the The Singhles Club subscription, which is simply £6 for 6 tracks via cornershop.com (and each track will come with a very special printable artwork & digital popadom*), each delivered to your inbox.

So in summary: Subscribe to The Singhles Club for £6 here & you get the 6 tracks and some exclusive printable artwork.

Please Subscribe here

The opening track for The Singhles Club is: Non-Stop Radio by Cornershop featuring Celeste is – electro, combining upbeat vocals with enough tweets criss-crossing bleeps to make it work a dancefloor, as heard on French retail shopfloors, supported by fresh styled video graphics (Rocket Science Lab, Bangalore).  The track comes with artwork of a printable cut out character.

(* is merely for whimsical effect – at the time of writing there was no such thing)